Category: Community Affairs Board of Advisors

Board of Advisors Announces Progress on Initiatives, Receives Praise and Advice From Former Athletics Director Bill Battle




By Kirsten J. Barnes
CCBP Graduate Assistant

The Division of Community Affairs’ two-day Board of Advisors meeting culminated in a dinner April 3 at Bryant-Denny Stadium, with an inspirational endorsement of their work by former UA Director of Athletics Bill Battle.

The 52 members of the board all earned UA degrees since 2000 and have worked for the past year on a three-pronged mission of increasing student success and retention, promoting student involvement in entrepreneurship and innovative initiatives, and supporting the development of effective leaders in the United States and abroad.

“This group represents our best and brightest younger alumni and I appreciate their work and commitment to this effort,” said Dr. Samory T. Pruitt, vice president for Community Affairs. “All of the group’s members are very busy, but they each made time and agreed to participate. I also appreciate how the leadership on our campus has embraced and supported their efforts.”

The group came together around the theme “Coming Back, Giving Back,” which epitomizes the purpose of their work.

“I think every one of us is here because Dr. Pruitt made an impact on our life,” said Katie Boyd Britt, who graduated from UA in 2004 and 2013. “We saw his vision for the campus and his vision to move the campus and community forward and there is not one of us that didn’t want to be a part of that again.”

Britt said that after they formed the group, there was so much interest that they had to turn away some prospective members. Summarizing commitments, Britt said some $25,000 had been contributed or pledged by the group toward fulfilling its mission.

“At this point in our lives, there are not a lot of opportunities to reconnect with campus and to meet other alumni,” said Britt, who serves as president of the BOA executive committee. “This has allowed us to have the opportunity to continue to move things forward and effect change and create a more positive atmosphere on the campus, while at the same time taking and sharing what we have learned with current students.”

Battle, now a special assistant to UA President Stuart R. Bell, walked away from retirement to return to UA in 2013 as director of athletics after experiencing huge success in the licensing of school athletic items popular with university fan bases. He told the assembly: “Leadership is getting someone else to do what you want them to do, as long as it is good for them as well.” He cautioned that success can be a moving target and how you define success depends on where you are in life.

“The American dream to me,” he said, “is to be successful in whatever you do, while leaving the world a better place than you found it. Any organization that you touch, if you can leave it a better place than you found it, then that is the hallmark of success.”

Battle talked about his lengthy sports career as a player, coach and president of an athletic licensing company, before returning to his alma mater. “I’m proud that I hold two records in SEC sports today. I was the youngest head football coach ever named and the oldest athletic director,” said Battle, who was 28 years old when named head football coach at the University of Tennessee and returned to UA as director of athletics after he had retired to succeed Mal Moore.

Battle thanked the group for their contributions to the UA community and challenged them to stay involved. “Thank you for your leadership and what you’re doing,” Battle said. “Give back with your presence … with your prayers. Pray for the University leaders. Ultimately, if you have the means and feel like you can give back financially, it is a great thing to do. Be here with your presence and help us keep our young people in school and help us keep them engaged when they leave.”

“Most of the money that has been raised came from their pockets,” Pruitt said of the group. “I am very proud of these young people and their commitment to helping make UA an even better place.”


Formed in early 2016, the UA Community Affairs Board of Advisors is comprised of young alumni who were campus leaders during their time as students at The University of Alabama. The board members possess a commitment to community engagement and student success, as well as a common desire to serve and a clear understanding of the importance of giving back.

Board of Advisors Announces Grant and Other Support




By Taylor Armer
CCBP Graduate Assistant

Scholarships and grants were announced at the wrap-up session prior to the closing dinner of the second annual Community Affairs Board of Advisors meeting Monday, April 3. Along with ideas to expand The University of Alabama’s reach to more prospective students, the board members convened in their respective subcommittees at the Ferguson Center with hopes of finalizing their goals from last fall’s meeting.

The Student Entrepreneurship and Innovative Initiatives committee obtained multiple commitments toward funding scholarships and grants. Led by co-chairs Nicholas Beadle and Reginald Miller, the committee laid out the groundwork for creating and sustaining a scholarship and grant program that would reward a cohort of innovative students during fall and spring semesters.

Beadle’s subcommittee proposed to grant up to $500 in seed funds to an initial cohort of 20 students from The EDGE Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation for its business pitch competition in the fall. EDGE is a local business incubator that houses the student-focused Alabama Entrepreneurship Institute and provides students with the necessary tools to foster an emerging business. Based on the committee’s predetermined criteria, the committee will select from the group three winners for grants — one $5,000 and two $2,500 awards — in the spring.

These grants would support innovative projects like the one to develop never-freeze water bottles for harsh arctic temperatures. Beadle and Miller called this and several other ideas they heard from student entrepreneurs “phenomenal.”

“Meeting with those students showed me that there is a need for more funding, and a need for more involvement,” Beadle said. “And I’m happy we could make that investment.”

The Global and Community Leadership subcommittee will invest in student travel opportunities. Its two $2,500 Board of Advisors Study Away Scholarships will be available in the fall for university students to use during spring and summer semesters. The travel scholarships will be awarded through Community Affairs and the Capstone International Center.

In addition to finalizing how they would raise funds for the scholarships and who would implement the award program, committee members discussed how to increase intermingling among various student groups with representatives from the International Students Association, Interfraternity Council and Student Government Association.

“They appreciated our interest as much as we appreciated their answers, which is always beneficial,” said Stephen McNair, co-chair of the committee. “Quite a few of them said, ‘when you come back next time, let us know so we can continue this discussion,’ which is extremely encouraging.”

Members of the Academic Success and Student Retention committee expressed similar feelings after speaking with UA Admissions representatives on ways they could be a part of the student recruitment of underserved student populations. Co-chair Holly Luther said that meeting with University staff and actual students who put a face to the committee’s goals was helpful in thinking of ways “to achieve better success” in retention and mentoring.

To ensure success in the latter, all committee members pledged to contact their area recruiter by the end of April. Elliot Knight, who conceived the idea, said that his fellow members would provide alumni support to the recruiters and encouraged other members of the Board of Advisors to do the same.

“This is a way of telling them that if there’s ever a way we can help, please let us know and we will be glad to do that,” he said.

He urged members interested in contacting their local admissions representative to visit gobama.ua.edu and key in their state. The website provides the recruiter’s phone number and email address.

The next official gathering of the Board of Advisors will take place during the fall 2017 semester.

New skin care service opens in east Montgomery

PorciaLove_ClinicOpening

River Region Dermatology is now open in east Montgomery providing comprehensive skin care services on Berryhill Road behind EastChase.

About 10 jobs were created when the doors opened at the practice, which includes two dermatologists, a nurse practitioner, two aestheticians, two nurses, and three other employees.

River Region Dermatology (RRD) provides services in medical dermatology, cosmetic dermatology, and laser surgery, said Dr. Porcia Love, practice founder and medical director.

"In addition to treating common skin conditions in adults and children, such as acne, eczema, hair loss, skin cancer prevention and treatment, we also provide a variety of cosmetic, laser, and spa services," Love said.

The staff can treat wrinkles, pigmentation, thin or dull appearing skin, facial volume loss resulting in folds and jowls, acne and other scars.

Some of these treatments include Botox, Dysport, fillers, chemical peels, facial rejuvenation, microneedling, and a variety of skin care products, Love said. "We also have a variety of lasers and light devices available for laser hair removal, treatment of rosacea, skin tightening, psoriasis, vitiligo, and more," she added.

Love sees many trends in the field that can help patients confronting skin and other problems.

She said many patients are seeking noninvasive (nonsurgical) procedures to assist them in aging gracefully. Major advances in laser surgery and light therapy have revolutionized their use in the treatment of many skin conditions.

"RRD offers the latest technology in laser treatments for a variety of medical and cosmetic skin concerns including acne, rosacea, scars, redness, brown spots, large pores, uneven skin texture, and wrinkles," Love said.

"We have specialized training in treating different skin types with lasers, which is very important when choosing the correct laser."

She said that body conturing is another hot item with many people wanting to tighten and tone a variety of places after losing weight, giving birth, or having stubborn areas.

"We offer Exilis Ultra, the first non-invasive device that delivers radio frequency and ultrasound energy that can be used to tighten skin on the face, around the eyes, neck, and body in a way that is both long-lasting and natural looking," she said.

And platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy is a method of skin rejuvenation that uses the body’s natural healing growth factors to stimulate skin renewal. "It can be used to correct wrinkles, fine lines, large pores, uneven texture, and skin laxity. PRP is also very effective for hair loss in both men and women," Love said.

The new practice is the vision of Montgomery native Love. An EastChase location was chosen because it is one of the fastest-growing parts of the Capital City, and there is a large demand for dermatology services in the area, she said.

"The response has been overwhelming, and we have received positive responses from patients," she added.

Love received her undergraduate degree from the University of Alabama, and her medical degree from Duke University. She completed her general surgery internship at Vanderbilt University, and her dermatology training at Duke University, where she served as chief resident.

She is also a clinical assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, Montgomery Regional Medical Campus. For more information on the practice, visit rrdermatologylaser.com.

Britt Puts Another Crack in the Glass Ceiling as Chief of Staff

KatieBritt_ChiefofStaff

MONTGOMERY—At a time when Democrats are trumpeting the cracks made in the glass ceiling separating women from the highest positions in government, Alabama’s Republican Senior Senator Richard Shelby, quietly opened a new fissure by hiring Katie Boyd Britt as his new Chief of Staff.

“Katie is a talented and hardworking professional, whose energy and knowledge of the State will be an asset to my office,” said Sen. Shelby of her hiring. “I am excited to have her rejoin our team as my new Chief of Staff, and I look forward to her work to help me serve the people of Alabama.”

Britt formerly served as Shelby’s Press Secretary and more recently, as Deputy Campaign Manager and Spokeswoman for Shelby for US Senate 2016. She left the law firm of Butler Snow to rejoin the Senator’s team in September.

Britt’s petite frame and welcoming smile, on occasion, belie her tenacity of spirit, quick mind and fierce loyalty. Born in Enterprise, Alabama, Britt’s rise to prominence in politics surprises no one who knows her.

She is married to former Alabama and New England Patriots offensive tackle, Wesley Britt. The couple have two children, Bennett (7-year-old girl) and Ridgeway (6-year-old boy).

After being informed of his wife’s opportunity to serve the country, Wesley didn’t hesitate to encourage her to heed Senator Shelby’s request, even though it meant uprooting the family from Alabama.

Wesley, who is an up and coming professional with Alabama Power, put his wife’s opportunity above his career, something Katie has confided has given her great pride in him.

Other women hold the Chief of Staff position in the Senate, but Britt is the first from Alabama.

Katie and Westley Britt are not related to APR’s Editor-In-Chief, Bill Britt.

UA Community Affairs Board of Advisors Member Endows Scholarship at Group’s Fall Meeting; Cathy Randall Serves as Guest Speaker

Photos by Jianlong Yang
CCBP Student

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — The Division of Community Affairs advisory board highlighted its fall meeting with the announcement of an endowed scholarship and a rousing pep talk from a lifetime leader in community service.

Tyrell F. Jordan, a Birmingham attorney and member of the board of advisors, has created a $25,000 endowed scholarship to support students from underrepresented urban communities.

A product of the Birmingham City Schools, Jordan graduated from The University of Alabama in 2001 with a degree in accounting. He received his JD from the UA Law School in 2004. “I always dreamed of serving my community through the practice of law,” said Jordan. “The University of Alabama’s commitment to helping all of its students reach their full potential provided me with an opportunity to fulfill that dream. I want to do my part to ensure that others have that same opportunity.”

Dr. Cathy Randall served as guest speaker for the “Coming Back, Giving Back” dinner gathering, which took place on campus at the Bryant Conference Center Monday, Sept. 26, following one-and-one half days of idea sharing by members of the board of advisors, who also heard from a cross section of UA students. Community Affairs board members and guests, University deans and vice presidents and current student leaders filled the Rast Room as Randall delivered words of encouragement.

Randall, chairman of the board of Pettus Randall Holdings, LLC, and director emerita of UA’s Honors Program, as well as the former chairman of the board of Randall Publishing Company and a former news anchor at CBS-affiliate WCFT-TV, recognized the vision of Dr. Samory Pruitt, vice president for the Division of Community Affairs, in the formation of this board of advisors, as well as the members’ commitment to community engagement and student success.

“Collecting this much talent, in one room, for one cause, has the potential to make a dramatic difference on this campus and in the lives of so many students,” Randall said. “I know of no university that has the vision that Dr. Pruitt has had [in order] to enable, to empower, and to inspire recent student leaders to directly impact a university.”

Randall told board members that they cannot begin to fathom how they can change the world of one individual by their involvement in that individual’s life, and that devising strategies to connect them to their fellow alumni and to individual students could truly be world-changing.

group

“Through Dr. Pruitt, the University of Alabama is laying at your feet resources to put legs on these proposals and others that you will develop that will emerge from your collaborative imagination, passion and experience,” Randall said.

Randall spoke about the definition of alma mater, which literally means fostering, or nurturing, mother. “This University served as our foster mother for those critical first years after leaving our families,” she said. “Your presence on this board demonstrates that you are the rare young person who responds in gratitude with action.

”You’ve been giving back since your undergraduate days and now you’re back to continue to give back in gratitude to this nurturing parent,” she said.

Randall quoted the late Sen. Robert Kennedy from his speech to the young people of South Africa on their Day of Affirmation in 1966. He said, “Few will have the greatness to bend history itself, but each of us can work to change a small portion of events, and in the total of all those acts will be written the history of this generation. … It is from numberless diverse acts of courage and belief that human history is shaped each time a man stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice. He sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring, those ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance.”

“The extraordinary generosity with which you’ve given your time to send forth one of those tiny ripples of hope,” Randall said, “will build a current together that will make better this University, this state, this world and the individual worlds of so many students. The opportunities before you are limitless — opportunities to impact the world, to impact the state, and to impact the individual students.”

Randall, who earned two PhD degrees from UA and has been named one of the top 31 women UA graduates of the century, was greeted with thunderous applause and a standing ovation upon the conclusion of her talk.

During the dinner meeting, members of the board of advisors executive committee gave their reports. While on campus, board members participated in “Listen, Learn and Lead” committee work groups and spent time hearing from three student panels on topics including academic success, global leadership and entrepreneurship. Outcomes of this second meeting since its formation in early 2016 included commitments of both time and money from board members in an effort to help current and future students find their roads to success at UA.

The Global and Community Leadership Committee, recognizing the importance of exposure to people and cultures different from your own, will provide financing for two $2,500 scholarships. One will be utilized to offer support for a foreign study opportunity, while the other will finance a local study project.

The Academic Success and Student Retention Committee has committed time to provide mentoring services to upperclassmen, with plans to help their mentees do the same by aiding them in developing a program of peer-to-peer mentoring with sophomores and freshmen.

The Student Entrepreneurship and Innovative Initiatives Committee recognized the need to pull different groups on campus — who are offering similar opportunities to students — together through their common goals. Additionally, this group desires to find ways to empower students to explore untraditional paths and to place UA graduates in incubators and businesses around the globe. The group has committed to having financial donations in place in the amount of $15,000 by their spring 2017 meeting, for the purpose of funding entrepreneurship projects by students.

The board of advisors is comprised of outstanding UA alumni committed to community engagement and student success. Members mentor current students and assist in recruiting outstanding future leaders. They also support campus-wide initiatives that increase student success and retention, facilitate student involvement in entrepreneurship and innovative initiatives, and support the development of thoughtful global and community leaders.

“It was amazing to see the passion, energy and drive to make a difference displayed by this group,” said Pruitt. “I look forward to the contributions these servant leaders will make to our University and its students.”

Katie Boyd Britt, board president, in recognizing Jordan’s scholarship gift, said, “I applaud Tyrell for his leadership and generosity in establishing this scholarship and am enthusiastic about how this board and its members will support and serve our University.”

Britt went on to say that this group recognizes that, as the inaugural board of advisors, they have a responsibility to set the bar high for those who will follow them.


The Division of Community Affairs was created in 2004 and is recognized nationally and internationally for its leadership in community engagement. The division provided the leadership for the recent reaffirmation of the University’s Carnegie curricular and community engagement classification. The division also publishes the Journal of Community Engaged Scholarship, one of the leading refereed journals in the field.

 

Community Affairs Board of Advisors to Meet; Dr. Cathy Randall to Speak at Dinner

Members of the executive committee of the Board of Advisors of the UA Division of Community Affairs stand with Dr. Samory T. Pruitt (upper left) following their first meeting in April. From left, Divya Patel, Americus, Georgia; Katie Boyd Britt, Birmingham and Washington, D.C.; Joseph Bryant, Birmingham; Calvin Han, Stamford, Connecticut; David Bailey, Nashville, Tennessee; Victoria Javine, Tuscaloosa; and Rashmee Sharif, Tuscaloosa.
Members of the executive committee of the Board of Advisors of the UA Division of Community Affairs stand with Dr. Samory T. Pruitt (upper left) following their first meeting in April. From left, Divya Patel, Americus, Georgia; Katie Boyd Britt, Birmingham and Washington, D.C.; Joseph Bryant, Birmingham; Calvin Han, Stamford, Connecticut; David Bailey, Nashville, Tennessee; Victoria Javine, Tuscaloosa; and Rashmee Sharif, Tuscaloosa.

 

Members of the newly formed Community Affairs board of advisors listen intently to a fellow board member at the inaugural meeting of the group, held on campus in April. The group will return to campus for its next full work session in late September.
Members of the newly formed Community Affairs board of advisors listen intently to a fellow board member at the inaugural meeting of the group, held on campus in April. The group will return to campus for its next full work session in late September.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Division of Community Affairs
The University of Alabama
250 Rose Administration Building, Box 870113
Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0113
Email: community.affairs@ua.edu
Phone: 205-348-8376

Sept. 12, 2016

By Diane Kennedy-Jackson
Community Affairs Publications Coordinator

 

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — The Community Affairs board of advisors will meet on the campus of the University of Alabama Sept. 25-27 to discuss progress on initiatives and to formulate next steps toward meeting goals.

Formed in early 2016, the board is comprised of outstanding UA alumni committed to community engagement and student success. Members mentor current students and assist in recruiting outstanding future leaders. They also support campus-wide initiatives that increase student success and retention, facilitate student involvement in entrepreneurship and innovative initiatives, and support the development of thoughtful global and community leaders.

“I continue to enjoy working with such a wonderful group of leaders and look forward to the impact they will have on current and future UA students,” said Director of Community and Administrative Affairs Carol Agomo, who is facilitator of the advisory group.

While on campus, board members will participate in committee work groups and spend time hearing from three student panels on topics including academic success, global leadership and entrepreneurship.

“I am enthusiastic about reconvening on campus with my fellow board members,” stated Katie Boyd Britt, president of the advisory board’s executive committee. “I am honored to be working on this board with my fellow alumni and am enthusiastic about our next steps forward in our efforts for our alma mater and her students.”

Dr. Cathy Randall will be the guest speaker for the “Coming Back, Giving Back” board of advisors dinner to be held Monday, Sept. 26, at the Bryant Conference Center on the UA campus. Randall is chairman of the board of Pettus Randall Holdings, LLC, and is director emerita of UA’s Honors Program, as well as the former chairman of the board of Randall Publishing Company and a former news anchor at CBS-affiliate WCFT-TV.

Randall will speak to members of the board of advisors — many of them students at UA during a time of tremendous growth at the University — on the importance of giving back.

“I will be extending appreciation to them, not only for what they did when they were students, but also for what they aspire to do,” said Randall, who went on to note the importance of the University’s commitment to engaging young people and connecting them to the University’s mission.

Randall earned two Ph.D. degrees from UA and has been named one of the top 31 women UA graduates of the century. Her other honors and service roles include national president of Mortar Board, Inc. and chairman of the Alabama Academy of Honor (the 100 most outstanding living Alabamians).

Dr. Samory T. Pruitt, vice president for the Division of Community Affairs, said, “We are very pleased to have someone with the distinguished background of Dr. Randall to speak at our second meeting of the Community Affairs board of advisors. We look forward to hearing the committee reports on the progress they have made toward plans that support their goals for UA students.”

Britt is president of the advisory board’s executive committee. Other members are Joseph Bryant, vice president; Divya Patel, treasurer; Calvin Han, secretary; David Bailey, chair of the entrepreneurship and innovative initiatives committee; Victoria Javine, chair of the academic success and student retention committee; and Rashmee Sharif, chair of the global and community leadership development committee.


The Division of Community Affairs was created in 2004 and is recognized nationally and internationally for its leadership in community engagement. The division provided the leadership for the recent reaffirmation of the University’s Carnegie curricular and community engagement classification. The division also publishes the Journal of Community Engaged Scholarship, one of the leading refereed journals in the field. 


 

UA Establishes Community Affairs Board of Advisors

BoardOfAdvisors_ReleaseHeader

 

Katie-Boyd
Katie Boyd, President

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — The Division of Community Affairs of The University of Alabama has announced the creation of an alumni board of advisors made up of outstanding individuals with a commitment to community engagement and student success.

The board will support campus-wide initiatives that increase student success and retention and facilitate student involvement in entrepreneurship, innovation and development of thoughtful global and community leaders.

The board will also mentor current students and assist in recruiting outstanding future leaders.

“We are excited that these outstanding graduates are willing to come back and support their alma mater in such a meaningful way,” said UA President Stuart R. Bell. “It is clear that this group of former students represent the great future leadership of our country and the world.”

The executive committee of the Board of Advisors is made of Katie Boyd Britt, president; Joseph Bryant, vice president; Divya Patel, treasurer; Calvin Han, secretary; David Bailey, chair of the entrepreneurship and innovative initiatives committee; Victoria Javine, chair of the academic success and student retention committee; and Rashmee Sharif, chair of the global and community leadership development committee.

According to Dr. Samory T. Pruitt, vice president for community affairs, the executive committee of the board has begun pulling together outstanding talent from UA alumni for membership on the inaugural Board of Advisors.

“The caliber of individuals willing to serve has simply been amazing,” Britt said. “We are all so eager, excited and appreciative of this opportunity to serve our University in this manner, and we are looking forward to our first meeting on campus in April.”

The Division of Community Affairs was created in 2004 and is recognized nationally and internationally for its leadership in community engagement. The division provided the leadership for the recent reaffirmation of the University’s Carnegie curricular and community engagement classification. The division also publishes the Journal of Community Engaged Scholarship, one of the leading refereed journals in the field.

Recently, Pruitt was elected president of the board of directors of the Engaged Scholarship Consortium, a group of national and international higher education institutions committed to community-engaged scholarship. His leadership has been recognized with induction into the Academy of Community Engagement Scholarship.

“The recognition we have received for our work on campus and internationally is most gratifying, and I am looking forward to the contributions this outstanding group of servant leaders will make to our society now and in the future,” Pruitt said.

The board will hold its first meeting April 28 and 29 on campus.

The University of Alabama, a student-centered research university, is experiencing significant growth in both enrollment and academic quality. This growth, which is positively impacting the campus and the state’s economy, is in keeping with UA’s vision to be the university of choice for the best and brightest students. UA, the state’s flagship university, is an academic community united in its commitment to enhancing the quality of life for all Alabamians.

CONTACT: Richard LeComte, media relations, rllecomte@ur.ua.edu, 205/348-3782
SOURCE: Carol N. Agomo, Division of Community Affairs, 205/348-7405

 

Calvin-Han-
Calvin Han
David-Bailey-
David Bailey
Divya-Patel-
Divya Patel
Joseph-Bryant-
Joseph Bryant
Victoria-Javine
Victoria Javine
Rashmee Sharif
Rashmee Sharif